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Americans love their guns; the right to bear arms is the second amendment in the Bill of Rights to the Constitution. Each state has laws dictating the right to carry concealed weapons and there are supporters for and against concealed carry, and gun ownership in general. Many claim to carry a weapon for self-defense. Of concern to the gun carrying individual, however, is what happens when they do fire their weapon in self-defense? A lot is going to depend on the situation at hand, but where will insurance come into play, and when, is an important question for those carrying weapons.

Topics covered:

Introduction

United States Concealed Carry Association

Limits

Definitions

Section IInsuring Agreement

Exclusions

Defense Payments and Expenses/Section II – Who is an Insured

Section IV–Conditions

Section V–Extended Reporting Periods

Personal Firearms Liability Insurance

Definitions

Exclusions

Self-Defense Insurance

U.S. Law Shield

Summary

 Introduction

The second amendment was adopted in December of 1791. The Supreme Court has declared that it applies to individuals as well as local governments, and that the right is not unlimited, nor does it prevent regulation of firearms. As of July 2016, there were over 14.5 million concealed carry permits in the United States. But permits are just the beginning; there are roughly 300 million guns owned by Americans, more than any other country on the planet. Not only do millions of Americans own and actively carry guns, but many states now have “shoot first” or “stand your ground” laws. In general these laws allow a person to use deadly force in self-defense in public without a duty to retreat. The shooting of Trayvon Martin in 2012 brought these laws to the forefront of everyone’s attention. The shooter, George Zimmerman, claimed he was acting in accordance with Florida’s stand your ground law and was acquitted of second-degree murder to the dismay of many. Many see the shoot first laws as a threat to public safety, although currently twenty-seven states have such laws.

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